Saturday, 5 September 2015

Harris Tweed - Feileadh beag

This afternoon I just finished sewing the 16 belt loops to the inside of my new winter Feileadh Beag. I've always wanted to make a kilt out of Harris Tweed tartan and when I found a Japanese retailer that imported it , I purchased 3 mtrs of double width, cut it in half and sewed it together and then added 16 belt loops to the inside for the drawstring. I did another kilt like this and it works very well and is easy to put on. At present it's just a wee bit hot for wearing this but later on I'll post some photos of me wearing it once the weather here is cooler. 




6 comments:

  1. Hello,

    I'm a french reenactor interested in the jacobite rebellions period. As I'm still constructing my costume, I'm searching for sources about the feileadh beag. Naturally, I found you website and your technique of constructing the small kilt. Is it historically accurate for a pre Culloden period?

    Apart from this question, I wold like to thank you for the work on this site... It's really interesting to follow your adventures in Japan.

    Best regards from France

    Niko

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  2. Hi Nikko , first of all thank you very much for your kind comments re my site and glad you enjoy reading it. There is not very much on the net to guide reenactors who have an interest in the Jacobite rebellions so hopefully some of my information is of use to others. Yes I would say that my feileadh beag is historically accurate, it is made from Harris tweed woven on the Isle of Harris with natural dyes and there is evidence in a period portrait of a drawstring being employed to gather the pleats and to make it easier to put on each day. Keep in touch Slainte Don

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  3. You deserve these compliments... I try, with my troop and our website, to achieve the same thing : share the knowledge. It's so important to share... (for info : www.leschardons.fr )

    I do not doubt a single moment that your plaid his historically accurate. ;-)

    My question is mostly about the belt loops inside the plaid. I find this technique really interesting and I'm seriously thinking about that for my plaid. I'm just asking myself if this technique is accurate.

    Slainte

    Niko

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  4. Hi Niko , I just checked out your home page and it looks like you do some fun events - great website !. I am a Jacobite of one here in Japan so I enjoy making items related to the Jacobite period and studying it , plus dressing in full 18th century Jacobite kit - 4 days a week as my wife owns a Celtic bar called Albannach. There is a lot of discussion on the use of belt loops but I do know quite a few reenactors in the UK and the US that use this method for their plaids. If you think about the period that men wore the plaid , it was not possible for many of them to lay their expensive plaids out on the wet boggy ground and pleat it each time they put it on. I and many others believe that the belt loop method was used. There is only one painting from the period that shows a drawstring plaid . So we have to guess that loops were used on the inside to form each pleat. One thing I can tell you is that I have 4 plaids and all of them have belt loops and they are very comfortable to wear. Slainte

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  5. Thanks for your answer... and the compliment about the site :-)

    Your reasoning about the loops is quite logical...

    And about the fabric for the loops?

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  6. Hi Niko , I made the loops out of some left over Harris tweed or you could use linen tape or even thin leather I think. Nobody will see it , so it is up to you

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